The Frequency of Abortion Caused by Chlamydia abortus in Aborted Fetuses of Sheep and Goats in Iran

  • Mona Hamedi Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran.
  • Hossein Esmaeili Mail Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran
  • Seyed Ahmad Madani Department of Animal and Poultry Health and Nutrition, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran.
  • Parviz Tajik Department of Theriogenology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran.
Keywords:
Abortion, Chlamydia abortus, Goat, PCR, Sheep.

Abstract

Background:      Chlamydia abortus, is one of the most important causes of abortion in small ruminants. Evaluating the frequency of chlamydial infection in abortion of animals is beneficial in epidemiological surveys. The purpose of the present study is to determine the frequency of abortion caused by Chlamydia abortus using PCR method. Methods:      A total of 200 fetuses were collected from 150 ewes and 50 does. The samples were collected from abomasal contents and lungs of the fetuses and using PMP gene of Chlamydia abortus, PCR was conducted. The infection occurrence with regard to the species of animals, age, gender and type of pregnancy along with age, numbers of pregnancy and numbers of abortion in the aborted animals were statistically analyzed by Chi-squared test, t-test and Spearman correlation coefficient which all were calculated using SPSS version 25. Results:      The bacterium DNA was detected in 47 fetuses. The infection occurrence didn’t have significant statistical relationships with the species, age and gender of the fetuses. Chlamydial infection in the twin fetuses was significantly more than the single ones. The infection had statistical relationship with ages and parturition numbers of the aborted animals but not with the numbers of abortion. Conclusion:      Regarding the high frequency of abortion caused by Chlamydia abortus in this study (23.5%), it is necessary to boost the information about the prevalence of Chlamydia abortus in different regions of our country.

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3. Essig A, Longbottom D. Chlamydia abortus: new aspects of infectious abortion in sheep and potential risk for pregnant women. Curr Clin Microbiol Rep 2015; 2(1): 22-34.
4. Selim A. Chlamydophila abortus Infection in Small Ruminants: A Review. Asian J Anim Vet Adv 2016; 11(10): 587-93.
5. World health organization for animal health, 2018. Enzootic abortion of ewes. Oie, France, Chapter: 3.7.5. pp. 1456-65.
6. Moeller Jr RB. Causes of caprine abortion: diagnostic assessment of 211 cases (1991–1998). J Vet Diagn Invest 2001; 13(3): 265-70.
7. Samkange A, Katsande TC, Tjipura-Zaire G, et al. Seroprevalence survey of Chlamydophila abortus infection in breeding goats on commercial farms in the Otavi Veterinary District, northern Namibia. Onderstepoort J Vet Res 2010; 77(1): 1-5.
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13. Laroucau K, Souriau A, Rodolakis A. Improved sensitivity of PCR for Chlamydophila using pmp genes. Vet Microbiol 2001;82(2): 155-64.
14. Heidari S, Derakhshandeh A, Firouzi R, et al. Molecular detection of Chlamydophila abortus, Coxiella burnetii, and Mycoplasma agalactiae in small ruminants’ aborted fetuses in southern Iran. Trop anim health pro 2018; 50(4): 779-85.
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19. Campos-Hernández E, Vázquez-Chagoyán JC, Salem AZ, et al. Prevalence and molecular identification of Chlamydia abortus in commercial dairy goat farms in a hot region in Mexico. Trop Anim health pro 2014; 46(6):919-24.
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Published
2020-08-23
How to Cite
1.
Hamedi M, Esmaeili H, Madani SA, Tajik P. The Frequency of Abortion Caused by Chlamydia abortus in Aborted Fetuses of Sheep and Goats in Iran. J Med Bacteriol. 9(1-2):1-8.
Section
Original Articles